A Fractured Mind

afracturedmind“When I have a difficult decision to make I always convene an inner committee meeting I allow all parts of me to air opinions; that way I know that all of me owns the decision.” Anonymous

A Fractured Mind, tells the story of Robert B. Oxnam. A highly-intelligent, distinguished scholar with 11 personalities. This was my first time reading a memoir on someone who struggles with Dissociative Identity Disorder (formerly known as MPD). I was disappointed that I couldn’t finish the book, but that doesn’t mean it won’t be beneficial to someone else. The reason I couldn’t read it is because when I’m coming out of a manic episode, it’s hard for me to comprehend too many storylines all at once. But, I will do my best to share my thoughts in a manner in which you (my audience) will understand.

I was four pages into Robert’s story when the above quote caught my attention and even though I wasn’t able to follow his story to the very end, it gave me a new respect for DID and what people go through. Oxnam built his career on perseverance and competitive determination. While climbing the ranks of Asian Society his dedication and outer persona was everything society trains us to be. By 1984, his life began to unravel. He no longer had the passion to succeed and this led to blocks of memory and fits of rage.

Fast forward to March of 1990, we meet Bob…

Robert is diagnosed with DID by Dr. Smith, a renowned psychiatrist, who uses the method of integration to merge Robert’s personalities into one dominant individual. “Bob” introduces himself as a sensitive, open-minded personality who seems to be very concerned with finding the solution to his elusive problem. Then we meet “Tommy.” A younger personality that comes across as defensive and very sarcastic. I tried to get to a point where I could distinguish between the first two alters, but by Chapter 5 I was unable to focus and follow the succession of events that led to the other storylines. So rather than trying to read the story in a state of confusion, I decided to put it down and read something more similar to my own struggles.

So in the end, I decided to review the book anyway in hopes that it would shed some light for people who may be trying to discover the cause of the madness and inner conflict that results from this particular mental disorder. I was intrigued by the conflict that arose from each individual and the differences they added to the making of the author. If you have read this memoir please feel free to share your comments and insights for further discussion.

****

His power is made perfect in weakness.

2 Corinthians 12:9

1 thought on “A Fractured Mind

Thank you for visiting!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.